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Ann Chernow, N.A. Born 1936.

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Cygnus. 1977. Silkscreen and collage. 30 x 20. Star series. Edition 50. Printed on coated paper. Signed in pencil. $850.

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Lollipop Lane. 2005. Etching. Chernow 157. 1 7/8 x 2 7/8. Edition 5, #1. A fine impression printed in black/brown ink on white wove paper on the full sheet with deckle edges. Signed, titled and numbered in pencil. $300.

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Time After Time. 1989. Lithograph with watercolor. 22 3/8 x 30 5/8. Edition 56 (plus 5 artist's proofs). A bright impression printed on the full sheet of Arches paper. Signed and numbered 4/56 in pencil. $650.

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Ann writes:

"My work is based on specific scenes and impressions related to movies from the 1930s and 1940s. I use film characters and period settings as a point of departure and then reinterpret. Contemporary faces are added but without altering the spirit of a cinematic moment. In blending past and present images I try to create a sense of dejà vu or nostalgia without the sentimentality often associated with specific film stars. I am interested in individual personalities and in using crowded scenes of choreographed women."

Images as social icons and attention to individual incident interest me. Depicting physical clumsiness alters the perception of each performer's physiognomy and brings it more to the 'real'. Gender is important, yet gesture and establishing a dramatic moment are paramount. A movie is never totally forgotten. Memories from films can be channels, metaphor and private reverie through which an artist can address the human condition. "

" My story with Isabel Bishop is that we became friendly after she visited my show at the Alex Rosenberg gallery in l982, she invited me up to her studio. She liked me very much personally and I became a kind of confidant to her until she became very sick, and spent most of her time in Riverdale. I admired her dedication and perseverance. In spite of family problems and ill health she worked as much as possible. (My hero is Giacometti whose life was work.)"

Ann's work is in the permanent collections of: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Yale University Art Gallery, Art in Embassies Collection of the U.S.A., Davison Art Center at Wesleyan University, Elvehjem Museum of Art in Madison, Wisconsin, The National Museum of Women in the Arts, The New York Public Library Print Collection, Syracuse University Art Collection, Housatonic Museum of Art in Connecticut, U.S.O. of Greater Metropolitan New York, Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Zimmerli Museum at Rutgers University, Reading Public Museum in Pennsylvania, Portland Museum of Art in Oregon, Arkansas State University, Duxbury Museum in Massachussetts, The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art in Connecticut, Museum of the City of New York, the Art Collection of the United Nations, and The Brooklyn Museum.

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American Fine Prints.

Allinson Gallery Index.

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