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Charles-François Daubigny. 1817-1878.

Etching

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Lever de Lune Sur Bords de l'Oise (Moonrise along the banks of the Oise River). 1875. Etching. Delteil, Melot 123.iii. 4 3/8 x 6 5/8 (sheet 7 7/8 x 11 1/8). As published in Frédéric Henriet, C. Daubigny et son oeuvre gravé, Paris: A. Lévy, 1875. A rich impression printed on cream laid paper with deckle edges on three sides. Signed, dated and titled in the plate. $225.

Cliché-Verres

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Le marais aux canards (Marsh with Ducks). 1862. Original cliché-verre. Delteil, Melot 133. 6 1/2 x 7 7/8 (image and sheet). Edition 150, #85. Posthumous impression from the 1921 edition of 150 printed in Paris by Sagot-Le Garrec on photo-sensitive vellum paper, with their violet seal verso (Lugt 1766a). Signed in the plate in reverse. $750.

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Le gué (The Ford). 1862. Original cliché-verre. Delteil, Melot 139. 11 1/2 x 14 1/4 (image and sheet). Edition 150, #71. Posthumous impression from the 1921 edition of 150 printed in Paris by Sagot-Le Garrec on photo-sensitive vellum paper, with their violet seal verso (Lugt 1766a). Signed in the plate in reverse. $1,250.

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La Fenaison (The Hay Harvest). 1862. Original cliché-verre. Delteil, Melot 142. 8 7/16 x 13 7/16 (sheet 11 z 14 1/4). Edition 150, #71. Reversed print, Posthumous impression from the 1921 edition of 150 printed in Paris by Sagot-Le Garrec on photo-sensitive vellum paper, with their violet seal verso (Lugt 1766a). Signed in the plate in reverse $1,250.

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L'Ane au pré (Donkey in the Field). 1862. Original cliché-verre. Delteil, Melot 143. 6 5/8 x 8 (image and sheet). Edition 150, #71. Posthumous impression from the 1921 edition of 150 printed in Paris by Sagot-Le Garrec on photo-sensitive vellum paper, with their violet seal verso (Lugt 1766a). Signed in the plate in reverse. $750.

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Le bouquet d'aunes (The Clump of Alders). 1862. Original cliché-verre. Counterproof. Delteil, Melot 145. 6 1/2 x 8 3/4 (image and sheet). Edition 150, #71. Posthumous impression from the 1921 edition of 150 printed in Paris by Sagot-Le Garrec on photo-sensitive vellum paper, with their violet seal verso (Lugt 1766a). Signed in the plate in reverse. $750.

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La Machine hydraulique (The Hydraulic Machine). 1862. Original cliché-verre. Delteil, Melot 147. Delteil 147. 8 3/8 x 13 1/2 (sheet 11 x 14). Edition 150, #85. Posthumous impression from the 1921 edition of 150 printed in Paris by Sagot-Le Garrec on photo-sensitive vellum paper, with their violet seal verso (Lugt 1766a). Signed in the plate. $1,250

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Translated from French, 'cliché-verre' means glass picture. The 19th century French painters Corot, Millet, Daubigny and others, used this method of making pictures, which involves creating a hand made negative. These artists took pieces of flat glass, smoked them with a lit candle, and drew images in the soot-covered surface with a sharp pointed instrument. Then they would place the glass over a sheet of photographic paper and expose it to light.
When light passes through the clear parts of the glass that is scratched, it produces a line drawing in black on a white background. Contact prints made from these negatives have a wonderful sense of belonging to the realms of both drawing and photography.
The shot glass holds, by its very nature, both drawing, printmaking and photography. But it is above all a process of multiplication of the image based on the early days of photography.
The cliché-verre is a printing process by photographic means, from a negative to done manually and by glass artist. The plate is first coated with a thick layer of collodion where the artist draws with a tip about it. The route passes through the translucent glass.
The draw is obtained by the action of light passing through the glass and mark the photo-sensitive paper, which is then found and fixed.
This technique, midway between printmaking and photography was invented in the 1850s by Constant Dutilleux and his son Charles Desavary.

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Barbizon on the outskirts of the Forest of Fontainbleau had already attracted regular visits from landscape painters wishing to paint in the open air (plein-air) directly from nature. J. F. Millet and Charles Jacque left Paris after the 1848 Revolution. Constant Dutilleux and Daubigny were regular guests at the village inn (as were Georges Sand, the Goncourts and other romantics). Adalbert Cuvelier visited annually bringing his photography students from Arras. In 1859 his son Eugène married the inn-keeper’s daughter and settled in Barbizon. Eugène Cuvelier showed the cliché-verre process to Millet, Rousseau and Daubigny. In 1853, Camille Corot produced the first "drawing on glass photographic". The subject was the woodcutter Rembrandt. He printed their glass plates, which remained in his possession. Few early impressions (printed on thin salted or albumin paper) have survived.
The Cuvelier collection of cliché-verres was re-printed in small editions of 10-15 prints in 1911 when it was acquired by Bouasse-Lebel. The plates passed to Le Garrec, successor to Edmund Sagot at the Galerie Sagot-Le Garrec, who printed the principle edition (150) before chipping the corners of the glass plates as cancellation and giving them to museum collections. The Le Garrec impressions are on gelatine paper and retain the photographically printed scratches and fingerprints in the borders and the ‘black’ edge of the glass plate.

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Corot.

Continental Fine Prints.

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